The ups and downs of writing.

There is a phrase: “juggling precious eggs in variable gravity”. It has generally been ascribed to a character in a story co-written by Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle, but Googling has so far failed to confirm this. Nevertheless, it is a useful phrase. It reminds me of writing.

There is so much to keep active when writing fiction, especially a longer piece, such a novel. Amongst the various eggs to be juggled are where the story is going, how the characters are developing and describing where they are. If you’re a writer, this should not be news. It’s not easy, either.

I started a writing course. Partly this was because I had a voucher, but also because I was curious to see what holes there might be in my knowledge. Well, to be honest, how big the holes might be in what I know of how to write.

I’m getting used to writers saying that they’re always learning and that every work is different. I’m comfortable, now, with the fact now that every writer writes their own way. Editing just written words is how I write. Dreaming up story away from my PC is how I write. Filling notebooks with pencil scribbling is not how I write, mostly because my handwriting has always been poor (I’ve taken notes in a lecture that I couldn’t read afterwards).

Getting dispirited at my low output seems to be how I write. I know this has something to do with the way I edit as I go. But I also know the joy at writing 1,500 words in a sitting that I’m very happy with.

I’m still learning how to be a writer. I’m just getting used to the fact that I will always be learning.

P.S. A nice commenter told me that the phrase is “juggling priceless eggs in variable gravity”. Googling for that turns up a lot more information! 🙂 Doesn’t change my post, though.

6 Comments

Filed under editing, writing

6 responses to “The ups and downs of writing.

  1. That wasn’t perhaps “The Burning City”, was it?

  2. Hey Wade, it’s priceless, not precious, according to google – Mote in god’s eye.

  3. Pingback: 10 Ways to Beat Writer’s Block | lasesana

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